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Yaba is destroying our young generation and the culprits should be given capital punishment October 27, 2007

Posted by bdoza in BANGLADESH, HEALTH.
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Few days back few young students of private universities from posh areas of Dhaka had been arrested with Yaba. In connection with this more interrogations were made and more persons were arrested including young women.

Networks of Yaba addictions, smuggling and Yaba businesses were detected.

Hundreds of young boys and girls of affluent background are thought to be addicted; they not only use themselves but sell it to others, they use it in groups and also involve in immoral acts. Posh cars and houses are used for carrying out the business and self-destructive habit. A chain of smuggling developed to carry in the drug from Myammer and also from India into Bangladesh and to distribute it to capital and Chittagong mainly.

Lately a businessmen with a strong family connection with big businesses is also arrested. He was caught red handed with huge amount of Yaba and its production equipments.

It is thought that because of the crackdown on Yaba in Thailand where capital punishment had been imposed on the offenders, Yaba use has been diverted to Bangladesh by the International criminals from late nineties to till now.

Yaba is a combination of Amphetamine and Caffeine. It produces intense hallucination, insomnia, anxiety, confusion, depression, liver and kidney disorders, suicidal tendencies and death. It does not increase the sexual power though it is deliberately implicated withYaba to promote its sale.

Extent of use of Yaba is alarming in Bangladesh. Why we had to take so many years to identify it? It was gross failure on our law enforcing agencies. It is also a failure on the part of our parents whose children are affected and our society in general and remain ignorant of the menace which is destroying our young minds and crippling our society.

Nevertheless, the effort RAB (Rapid Action Battalion), our special force to combat terrorism has given to arrest the culprit is praiseworthy. We hope that the major offenders will be given exemplary punishment.

But few actions from law enforcing agencies will not be enough, it will require a social movement with participation of people from all walks of life including parents, teachers, media, police, judges etc .

 

An ordinary citizen


 

 

Comments»

1. sun flower - October 28, 2007

Following is the excerpts from ‘an ordinary citizen’

Few days back few young students of private universities from posh areas of Dhaka had been arrested with Yaba. In connection with this more interrogations were made and more persons were arrested including young women.
Networks of Yaba addictions, smuggling and Yaba businesses were detected[…]

2. mahadi - December 26, 2007

Can u give me some specific information about the yaba trafficking route, their peddelers and buyers. I am writing a term paper on it.

3. bdoza - December 30, 2007

Mahadi,
Thanks for your quary. Following is an excerpts from Daily Star of 28/10/07. Hope that this will give some light to your question.

[TRAFFICKING ROUTE
During the late 90s, Yaba would be smuggled in from Thailand in small amount. Since 2000, it began to enter the country in large numbers from Myanmar through Teknaf border. Now there is a vast cartel operating on either side of the Myanmar-Bangladesh border.

An investigation by The Daily Star reveals that dealers in the source area never go out of their localities. They employ mules for the tablets to reach the capital. Some dealers from Dhaka would prefer ferrying the pills themselves from Teknaf and Cox’s Bazar since there had been little risk of being busted on the way.

A youth who along with a friend was involved in the trade shared with this correspondent a detailed account of how they operated. He said they got into the business after a friend from a rich family convinced them how they could make some fast buck out of it.

They were smart enough to hit the right spot in Teknaf. They did not have to go anywhere; their Teknaf connection arranged it all. All they had to do was carrying the pills to Dhaka which was anything but risky then.

Like many others in the business, they would wear specially tailored shirts to carry the drug. The shirts are made in a way that whenever one raises his/her arms the hidden pockets move out of the area to be searched. Unless the law enforcers did a strip-search it was hard for them to find the tablets.

Most of the time the two would carry around 500 pills and take passenger buses. Around a year ago they would buy a pill usually at Tk 100 and sell that to dealers in Dhaka for Tk 200-220. The end users would have to count Tk 350-Tk 500.

Initially, it was tough to win the confidence of the dealers in Dhaka as they suspected the two might be planted by police or Rab.

Asked for some names of those who are active in the capital, he said he knew only two major dealers–one in his late thirties would operate from a Chinese restaurant in Maghbazar and the other from his house located between Star Kebab crossing and Abahani Club in Dhanmondi area.

Meanwhile, a police official said they suspect that besides smuggling, the sellers depend on clandestine laboratories as well to produce the pills.

Thursday’s arrest of Amin Huda and his associates with a huge cache of Yaba tables has only firmed up the apprehension.]

For further information you may contact the Daily Star and the correspondent of this piece of information.

An ordinary citizen

4. rahul - June 30, 2008

can u give me some specific information about drug anti-trafficking law in bangladesh. I’m writing a term paper on it.
Thanks

5. bdoza - July 1, 2008

Rahul,
Thanks for your interest in the post.
But I am neither a lawyer nor a legal expert. The following information may give you clue to further search the laws against drug-trafficking in Bangladesh. This is excerpt from Banglapedia:

‘The government of Bangladesh recognises drug abuse as one of the most serious problems and is firmly committed to supporting international, regional and bilateral efforts aimed at its prevention and control. The national drug enforcement policy is embedded in the Narcotics Control Act 1990. The government took measures to amend the Narcotics Control Act 1990 in line with UN Conventions. The major features of drug abuse prevention and control in this legislation are: (i) Establishment of the National Narcotics Control Board (NNCB) with the task of drug abuse prevention and control, and to encourage foreign and domestic participation in drug control activities; (ii) Compulsory treatment of drug addiction; (iii) Establishment of drug treatment centres; (iv) Obligation of organisations and individuals to supply information on drug abuse; (v) Restrictions and control on prescription of certain drugs which lead to addiction if abused; (vi) Control of production, distribution, prescription, sale and use of sedative, hypnotic and tranquilliser drugs; (vii) Classification of scheduling of drugs according to control measures and intensity of harmful effects; (viii) Different types of punishment for different drug offences according to the severity of their nature and quantity of drugs involved; (ix) Financial investigation of drug crimes; (x) Freezing and forfeiture of assets of drug traffickers; and (xi) Establishment of drug testing laboratory to speed up the trial of drug cases.’

‘Bangladesh inherited the partnership in the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs 1961. It became a signatory to the Convention on Psychotropic Substances 1971 and the UN Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic substances 1988, and signed the SAARC Convention on Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic substances in 1990’

So you may directly contact the Narcotic Control Office and/or search for details of Narcotic Control Act 1990.

Wish you best luck.

6. Ali ahammad Sarker. - October 16, 2009

TRAFFICKING ROUTE
During the late 90s, Yaba would be smuggled in from Thailand in small amount. Since 2000, it began to enter the country in large numbers from Myanmar through Teknaf border. Now there is a vast cartel operating on either side of the Myanmar-Bangladesh border.

An investigation by The Daily Star reveals that dealers in the source area never go out of their localities. They employ mules for the tablets to reach the capital. Some dealers from Dhaka would prefer ferrying the pills themselves from Teknaf and Cox’s Bazar since there had been little risk of being busted on the way.

A youth who along with a friend was involved in the trade shared with this correspondent a detailed account of how they operated. He said they got into the business after a friend from a rich family convinced them how they could make some fast buck out of it.

They were smart enough to hit the right spot in Teknaf. They did not have to go anywhere; their Teknaf connection arranged it all. All they had to do was carrying the pills to Dhaka which was anything but risky then.

Like many others in the business, they would wear specially tailored shirts to carry the drug. The shirts are made in a way that whenever one raises his/her arms the hidden pockets move out of the area to be searched. Unless the law enforcers did a strip-search it was hard for them to find the tablets.

Most of the time the two would carry around 500 pills and take passenger buses. Around a year ago they would buy a pill usually at Tk 100 and sell that to dealers in Dhaka for Tk 200-220. The end users would have to count Tk 350-Tk 500.

Initially, it was tough to win the confidence of the dealers in Dhaka as they suspected the two might be planted by police or Rab.

Asked for some names of those who are active in the capital, he said he knew only two major dealers–one in his late thirties would operate from a Chinese restaurant in Maghbazar and the other from his house located between Star Kebab crossing and Abahani Club in Dhanmondi area.

Meanwhile, a police official said they suspect that besides smuggling, the sellers depend on clandestine laboratories as well to produce the pills.

Thursday’s arrest of Amin Huda and his associates with a huge cache of Yaba tables has only firmed up the apprehension.

7. M - June 16, 2010

can u tell me how can be treated an yaba addicted patient? where r the treatment centers? please.

8. bdoza - June 17, 2010

A psychiatrist can give u a better answer or u can contact National Institute of Mental Health, Shere-e-Bangla nagar, near Sharawardi Hospital, Dhaka . U can also meet the Director of the Institute- Dr. Golam Rabbani.

9. M - June 19, 2010

THANKS.AMI JANI NA AMI TAKE FERATE PARBO KINA.
AUTHORITY KENO KONO ATTEMPT NEY NA BOLTE PAREN? DHONGSHO HOE JASSE AMAR SHOB!

bdoza - June 19, 2010

keep up the hope to the last of ur patience.But don’t destroy ur life because of other wrong indulgence of self abuse.
I have no answer to the reluctance of our authorities.
They will not awake until they also embrace the same fate!

10. M - October 19, 2010

hello, how r u? we r fine now.and he is alright.now he is concious about himself.alhamdulillah.

11. bdoza - October 19, 2010

I am fine.
It is good to hear that he is alright now.
Alhamdulillah.

12. Al - Amin Pervez - June 26, 2011

hello…Can anyone give me any information about the test of detecting the presence of Yaba in human body. Is there any lab in bangladesh where these kind of test is available? What substance presence shows that the person is a yaba addict and what will be the range? please please i need to know these information to as early as possible. I need to save someone’s life.


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